Athens

We finally arrived in Athens and found our hotel. It was located in the old section of Athens called “The Plaka” and our room had a view of the Acropolis. We grabbed a bite and began walking and walking uphill till we reached our destination 515 feet above sea level. Displayed before us were the temples:                                                                             Acropolis

The Propylaea means foregates; this was the entrance to all. This structure was completed in 431BC.

Next was the Erectheum (Okay, grow up. I heard some giggles over the name) completed in 407BC. The most famous feature were the Caryatids, statues of maidens used as columns.

AcropolisAcropolis

Finally The Parthenon completed about 432BC. It was designed to honor Athena for assisting them winning a battle over the Persians. It is said that Pericles (he of the   Golden Age of Pericles) supervised       much of the construction.

As we were departing the Acropolis we saw a small hill with a memorial in front of it. The placard said this was the site where in AD50 Saint Paul spoke to the Athenians about The Unknown God; for a rerun of this speech refer to youtube  Oops, I meant Acts 17:22-34.

250px-Ariospagos

One more temple I could never forget is The Temple of the Olympian Zeus. This colossal structure was completed in 132 AD. Today it is little more than 15 columns in the middle of a cinder lot. But what columns, these are God-sized columns. They reach! They stretch! No, the appropriate word is, they soar 90 feet upward reaching toward Zeus himself. Remember that the columns of the Parthenon are only 34 feet tall, these are three times that height.

Acropolis

My main comment on these ruins is, “If we had sights like these, we’d probably tear them down and build parking lots.

More to come

 

Departure

 Departure

Mark and I were very much alike. We were analytical, liked to travel, enjoyed art and statuary, and—oh yes, we both enjoyed the finer things in life. He had been to Europe after high school and now it was my turn.   

02_Don_and-Mark    01_europe-map-route

Map of my Fantasy trip

Departure day was finally here. We were finally on our way. Make connection at JFK and wake up in the morning in Athens. Sounds good doesn’t it?

Our intensive planning had not included a problem with the East Coast radar grid and our plane leaving without us.

There was a convention in New York and all hotels were full. I ended up getting a reservation at the Crown Plaza in White Plains. I had never been to White Plains and neither had our cab driver. So here we were on our first day of the trip in a cab driven by a foreigner to a place we’ve never been and we hadn’t even left the country.

Have you ever planned something extensively and then watched it fall apart? It reminds me of the oft-repeated adage, “When you’re up to your neck in alligators, it’s hard to remember that your initial task was to drain the swamp.”

I guess since I retired, I forgot how to drain a swamp.

The next morning we returned to NYC and discovered that you can ride a train from White Plains for $10 instead of the $120 we had paid the cab driver.

We walked around NYC for several hours and returned to the airport. Since all of us had been rebooked the flight was really full and we were jammed into the “cough—cough” smoking section. Hopefully tomorrow would be a better day.

More to come

More Time

Going back to the start. “It was time.” Time for what?

I had retired early with the expectations of enjoying life, and with enough frequent flyer miles for two first-class tickets to anywhere in Europe.

One evening these plans were dashed when my wife told me she was afraid to fly that far. I pleaded, cajoled, threatened, — and gave up. Of course I managed to throw this at her occasionally.                                                                                                  Anger

Jackie could tell I was upset but she couldn’t overcome her fears.         .

Then she came up with a brilliant idea. She called my son Mark and asked him if he could travel to Europe with me. He said if he could sandwich it in with work and Law school he’d certainly go.

Mark was able to get the time off and we started our plans. This would be the best trip of my life! The fulfillment of all my travel hopes and dreams, “Fulfillment is a Place”.

So “What time was it? It was time! Time to Start, time to Plan, time to Do!

 

Have you ever wanted something so badly, it seemed that you could taste it?

Tell me about them. This a family blog so keep it clean 😉

It was Time

It was time!                  MC900019961

This is the opening sentence to an eBook I recently published on Amazon.

Fulfillment is a Place, is a travel narrative that I originally published with B&W photos; who can afford color printing costs? However, the technological improvements made to the Kindle Fire and other readers have now made it possible to use color photos in our publications.

I didn’t realize how much work I was getting into. I took advantage of the opportunity to workdo some editing and then went to the photo albums. After selecting photos I scanned them to digital format.

This little clip is supposed to represent Sisyphus rolling the stone up the hill (kinda poor isn’t it, best that I could do).

The next problem was identification; I knew what the pictures were but how do I tell you.

In a printed book the photos are inserted with a description that stays in place (with the photo). The flexibility of eBooks make this impossible. Fonts can be made larger or smaller thus captions can be separated from the photo.

So what’s the solution: Some people advocate creating a Table with the photo in one row and the caption in a row below this. The table consisting of photo and caption firmly attached is scanned as a jpeg and inserted into the eBook.

I prefer to increase image- canvas size. This leaves the picture the same size but adds space to the top or bottom. The caption can then be typed into this space.

Any other ideas?

Did you all know that you can use color pictures in eBooks? Of course you did.

More to come